Quick Answer: What are the 3 main focus of sustainable tourism?

Sustainability principles refer to the environmental, economic, and socio-cultural aspects of tourism development, and a suitable balance must be established between these three dimensions to guarantee its long-term sustainability.

What is the focus of sustainable tourism?

Sustainable tourism is defined by the UN Environment Program and UN World Tourism Organization as “tourism that takes full account of its current and future economic, social and environmental impacts, addressing the needs of visitors, the industry, the environment and host communities.”

What are the 3 components of a sustainable community?

Sustainability is most often defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet theirs. It has three main pillars: economic, environmental, and social.

What are the types of sustainable tourism?

Tourism forms identified by the literature as being “sustainable” are numerous: ecological tourism (ecotourism), green tourism, soft, rural tourism and agrotourism, community tourism, solidarity and responsible tourism, all these opposing to the traditional, mass tourism.

What are the 3 pillars of sustainability give an example within each category?

The figure at the top of this page suggests that there are three pillars of sustainability – economic viability, environmental protection and social equity. Other dimensions could be represented – for example ‘technical feasibility’, ‘political legitimacy’ and ‘institutional capacity’.

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What are the 3 aspects of tourism?

However, it is also important to recognize that there are clear links between the three aspects of tourism – the environmental, economic, and social dimensions – and these are below Three dimensions of sustainable tourism are: Environmental. Economic. Social.

What is the most sustainable form of tourism?

According to Fennell, “Ecotourism is a sustainable form of natural resource-based tourism that focuses primarily on experiencing and learning about nature, and which is ethically managed to be low-impact, non-consumptive, and locally-oriented (control, benefits, and scale).